The Red Pyramid, Part Deux

25 Oct

Being the wonderfully fair fellow that I am, I asked Michael C—a self-professed Red Pyramid fan—to write a real review of this Riordan tale for y’all to peruse.  Here’s what he’s crafted—the first official student review ever on I’m Always Right:

 

Hello everybody. Michael C here. I’m writing this because Mr. Ferriter challenged me to write a review of The Red Pyramid.

I decided to read The Red Pyramid again before I started writing and just like the other time I read it, IT WAS GREAT!!

You know why? Because the book has magic, fights, gods, demons, and much more.

Now I know some of you don’t like stories that are part realistic part fantasy (Mr. Ferriter) but that wouldn’t be a problem because it isn’t realistic past the first 15 pages or so. Also if you are concerned that the book has lots of driving it doesn’t. Or more precisely when it does the character telling the story at the time is out cold or the book just skips over the driving.

So really who WOULDN’T want to read a story with action, surprises, and a little bit of humor here and there?

In the beginning of the story two kids named Sadie and Carter get together on visiting day and their dad takes them to a museum. BORING!!! Then their dad blows up the Rosetta Stone and releases five gods into the mortal world. AWESOME!!!

After that it only gets better as they learn the truth behind their family and train with magic to defeat the looming peril that is about to be unleashed by Set (evil Egyptian god).

What really made the book great for me was watching Carter turn into a warrior as the book progressed. I mean isn’t it cool to watch the characters develop during the course of the book? At the beginning he is a scrawny nerd and by the end he is challenging gods to duels. How cool is that?

Anyway they make some of the gods friends and they fight some of the other gods (I liked the fighting better). Eventually they get to The Red Pyramid and end up sending Set back to the Duat (kind of like a magical storage bin) after they discover that they will need his help to defeat Apophis (the embodiment of chaos).

Overall one of the best books I ever read.

Red Pyramid Rating: Way70

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10 Responses to “The Red Pyramid, Part Deux”

  1. wferriter October 25, 2010 at 10:44 pm #

    Michael wrote:
    What really made the book great for me was watching Carter turn into a warrior as the book progressed. I mean isn’t it cool to watch the characters develop during the course of the book? At the beginning he is a scrawny nerd and by the end he is challenging gods to duels. How cool is that?

    You know, kid, you might just have my attention here. I like the story of an underdog who trains to do something great. I also like the whole idea of training to be a warrior.

    Maybe…just maybe…I’ll read this thing.

    Probably not, but I’m at least a little interested now.

    Mr. F

  2. Brent October 25, 2010 at 10:58 pm #

    I cant disagree more the red pyramid was longer boring then interesting, the story was built for some kind of amazing ending and the story just didn’t have that.

    Michael says

    Anyway they make some of the gods friends and they fight some of the other gods (I liked the fighting better)

    I say

    The two characters sadie and carter really only have one god friend and thats bast. They also had Zia who was from the house of magic.

    Most of the book is the trip to the red pyramid with obstacles.

    I think most of the obstacles were sort of predictable. In most books they are because you know the characters have to survive to the end or the book tends not to be that good.

    At some points in the story it seemed like Rick Riordan was trying to end the part especially in the obstacles.

    Michael says

    After that it only gets better as they learn the truth behind their family and train with magic to defeat the looming peril that is about to be unleashed by Set (evil Egyptian god).

    I say

    IN this part rick riordan drags it out it seems as if carter and Sadie don’t ever get it. Also the whole point of Bast was to protect them and constantly remind them about there family.

    How did she know so much about the family?

    I think Rick Riordan makes all of his books based off the hit novel the lightening thief

    Here are how his stories are built:

    First couple pages have something interesting on them, that gets you interested on the book

    Whole middle of the book is the trip to the end with obstacles, for what ever reason kids like

    ending has action, but by then you should be tired of the book

    way 10

    you haven’t changed my mind with all your exaggerations

  3. Blair G. November 2, 2010 at 12:47 am #

    Brent says:

    “I think Rick Riordan makes all of his books based off the hit novel the lightening thief”

    I can’t disagree with you more, man! Have you ever thought, just maybe, that’s just the way Mr. Riordan writes? The
    lightning Thief:3 main characters, one with great power, one who’s smart, and one who eats plastic. The Red Pyramid: 4 or 5. Two who have awesome powers, who are not the CHILDREN of the gods, but the hosts of the gods.1 who is a cat, another who is locked up in a coffin, and one who works magic. Does that really seem the same?

    The Lightning Thief: If I’m remembering clearly, it has more dangerous monsters with unknown ways to kill them.
    The Red Pyramid: BIG monsters, with Egyptian hieroglyphs explaining how to kill them.

    Try paying attention to details like that. 😉

    See ya,
    Blair

    • Brent S November 6, 2010 at 12:48 am #

      Blair says

      lightning Thief:3 main characters, one with great power, one who’s smart, and one who eats plastic. The Red Pyramid: 4 or 5. Two who have awesome powers, who are not the CHILDREN of the gods, but the hosts of the gods.1 who is a cat

      Okay goes from 3 characters to 4, they just add 1 more powerful one. The god who is a cat is practically equivalent to someone eating plastic.

      HOWis that any different ?

      • Blair G June 20, 2011 at 10:29 am #

        Well, Bast (the cat) has more powers and is more helpful to Carter and Sadie than Grover is to Annabeth and Percy. And you’re missing another major character in “The Red Pyramid.” So there are 4 main characters, Sadie, Carter, Bast, and Mr. Kane. At any point in time from “The Lightning Thief” there are only 3.

  4. Blair December 15, 2010 at 1:53 am #

    Brent says:
    Okay goes from 3 characters to 4, they just add 1 more powerful one. The god who is a cat is practically equivalent to someone eating plastic.

    Not really, cats don’t eat plastic. Cats are nothing like goats. And “Goat Boy” in the lightning Thief was nothing like Bast. Sure, they may both be part animal, but would you call that almost equivalent to each other?

    Brent also said:
    HOW is that any different ?

    Well, think about it. It’s very different. The plots of the books are nowhere near the same. The Red Pyramid: the kids are trying to kill the chaos god and find Osiris, while in the Lightning Thief the kids are trying to return a lightning bolt (I almost typed Lightning boot).

    See ya,
    Blair 😉

  5. Brent S March 14, 2011 at 8:05 pm #

    The next book is called The Throne Of Fire. You can read the preview to the book here

    http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/excerpts/2011-01-11-kane-chronicles-2_N.htm

    The link gives you the first chapter and other info.If you liked the first this might be somethings that intersts you. So take a look.

    Someone should start this up again!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Sorry if i double posted

  6. Carly B September 14, 2011 at 12:40 am #

    I loved The Throne of Fire and want the third book in the series to come desperately.

    I loved the book because it is action packed and you always are wondering what will happen next. Another thing I like about the book is like i said with the book that must not be named it teaches you about egyptian mythology and the egyptian gods.

    The only down side to this book is that the main action takes so long to get to and then the main action ends really fast.

    Another thing that I did not like about this book is that Zia one of the main characters comes out to be the opposite of her shabti in The Red Pyramid, while I admit it does make the book interesting it also makes me feel bad for Carter who thought he had finally come through and gotten Zia to like him when it just turned out to be a clya copy of her while the real version still does not like him and likes his sister Sadie, that is just a disappointment for Carter and great news for Sadie.

    • wferriter September 15, 2011 at 5:59 pm #

      Carly wrote:
      The only down side to this book is that the main action takes so long to get to and then the main action ends really fast.

      The ONLY problem, Carly?! That seems like a really big problem!

      And that’s been my criticism of Riordan books all along. Whenever it takes a long time to get to the action and then the action ends quickly, I’m left frustrated as a reader.

      That’s a pattern for this guy’s work.

      So let me ask you a question: KNOWING that Riordan has a pattern of this kind of writing, why are you so exicted about the next book in the series? What is it about his writing that makes you want to read it even though it has such a big weakness?

      Mr. F

      • Carly B September 18, 2011 at 2:44 pm #

        Mr. Ferriter wrote: KNOWING that Riordan has a pattern of this kind of writing, why are you so exicted about the next book in the series? What is it about his writing that makes you want to read it even though it has such a big weakness?

        Well Mr. Ferriter I like this book a lot because of the action that is in it, even if it does take a while to get to the main action.

        Another thing that keeps me interested in the books is that I am very interested in learning about the different gods that people worship in different places, and in Riordan’s books I love the way that he uses fiction but at the same time teaches you about some things that are nonfiction.

        I know that how he ends the action so quickly is a weakness and that his writing would be better if he elaborated more I can’t argue with that. So I think that you should treat The Lightning Thief with a little more respect.

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