Ender’s Game: A Terrific Beginning

28 Sep

I’ve got to let you in on a little secret:  I HATE science fiction stories almost as much as I HATE Rick Riordan books.

Hard to believe, huh?

That’s why Ender’s Game—which is the first book in a series of something like 20 books starring a fascinating character named Ender Wiggin—caught me by surprise.  Knowing that it was a science fiction title, I fully expected to put it down after about three chapters.

But I didn’t.  In fact, I almost couldn’t put it down.  I was just dying to know whether or not Ender—who is just a boy in the story—is able to save the earth from complete destruction or not.

That’s right: The earth is about to be destroyed by aliens. Buggers, to be exact.  Creatures that work and live and follow orders just like ants.  Except they’re a whole heck of a lot more brutal than ants.

And they can fly spaceships.

And they’ve already invaded twice.

Ender—just like all of the other really smart kids from earth–has been taken from his home and sent to a military training station in space to prepare for the next Bugger invasion.  He’s put—just like all of the other really smart kids from earth—on to a battle team that trains together like a little army.  He learns—just like all the other really smart kids from earth—the ins-and-outs of fighting in space.

But Ender’s NOT just like all of the other really smart kids from earth.

He’s smarter.

Way smarter.

And that makes him a lot of enemies. Older boys try to embarrass him whenever they get the chance.  They even attack him in the hallways and in the showers, trying to beat him up.  The thought of a younger boy doing better than them in competitions just plain makes them angry.

But the leaders of battle school love Ender.  In fact, they see him as the only hope of saving earth—and they put a ton of pressure on him.  They promote him quickly, making him a commander of an army.  They put his army into unfair fights.  They make his team fight more often than anyone else’s team.

And Ender keeps winning….until he quits.

Now, I know what you’re thinking:  “Why’s Ferriter always writing about books that involve battles and fights and blood and guts?  Doesn’t he EVER read anything else?’

But it wasn’t the battles and fights and blood and guts that caught my attention in Ender’s Game.  It’s Ender himself.  He’s torn inside by the turmoil of being a leader even though he’s a boy.  He’s committed to his friends and loves feeling close to other people—the kind of close that teammates always feel when they’re involved in fierce competitions.

And those themes are the kind of themes that I love in a story. I think it’s because I’ve always loved being a part of a team and because my friends mean more to me than most anything in the world.

Sure, I loved seeing Ender battling his way through the entire Bugger invasion fleet.  Sure, I loved seeing him whip older boys in competitions where he shouldn’t have stood a chance of winning.

But I enjoyed watching him grow up and make friends even more.

Ender’s Game Rating:  Way75

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4 Responses to “Ender’s Game: A Terrific Beginning”

  1. Brent September 28, 2010 at 9:31 pm #

    Enders Game

    A book with a very childish plot ,but the book might be meant for adults.

    The book had very confusing sub plots . When I picked it up it was very confusing especially at the beginning. At the beginning it leaves you with no info just them taking of his monitor. It left me wondering why does he have a monitor on in the first place.

    Mr Ferriter says

    But the leaders of battle school love Ender. In fact, they see him as the only hope of saving earth—and they put a ton of pressure on him. They promote him quickly, making him a commander of an army. They put his army into unfair fights. They make his team fight more often than anyone else’s team.
    And Ender keeps winning….until he quits

    Heres something I don’t like someone explain how a young boy can save the earth even if someone was that smart at that young of an age, wouldn’t he want do something the would backfire extremely.

    Mr Ferriter says

    But I enjoyed watching him grow up and make friends even more.

    I say it seems as if every time he made a good friend or someone he could trust he got upgraded to another army. Those friends did help at the end but it seemed every time tho book got happy something happened.

    Did you mention Valentine or Peter in that review?

    Valentine was Enders sister who cared for him allot. Peter was Enders Brother who beat him up and made fun of him. When Peter would try to make fun of him or fight him Valentine wold team up with Ender.

    At the beginning of this comment I said the plot was childish.

    The plot is childish it talks about how a young boy leads a army to save the planet. Really?

    All sci-fi books are childish but this one seemed to have a really childish plot.

    I also said the book seems to be meant for adults the beginning was okay but very confusing.

    The vocabulary is for adults.

    My summary

    Ender was drafted into the army and at a young age. The whole world depends on him as he leads the army

    my rating

    way 4o

    • Zoe September 29, 2010 at 9:29 pm #

      YES the Enders Game is one of the best books i have ever read!

      I recommend it to anyone who has not read it. Even though SF is not the best genre i have ever read but i did LOVE the Enders Game.

      Mr Ferriter: I think the book should deserve a way:80. Peter and Valentine were also important characters in the story.

      Like Brent said: Valentine was Enders sister who cared for him allot. Peter was Enders Brother who beat him up and made fun of him. When Peter would try to make fun of him or fight him Valentine wold team up with Ender.

      But i don’t agree with another thing Brent said: A book with a very childish plot ,but the book might be meant for adults.

      Brent.. How is it Childish? If you say something like that you have to back it up with facts. You have failed to do so. If you can then i will consider changing my mind.

  2. Redhead September 28, 2010 at 9:53 pm #

    great write up! I haven’t read Ender’s Game in years, but it’s a great book.

    So many people think SF is all about space battles, and sciency stuff, and sf-y stuff, and aliens, and weird stuff. But the best SF is just like the best fantasy and the best literature and the best whatever genre – it’s about people, and struggles, and figuring life out, and all that good stuff.

    but be careful, Enders Game is a gateway book to the wonderful world of SF!

  3. Brian September 29, 2010 at 9:26 pm #

    Enders Game might be one of the greatest books on the planet. This book is one that many of you should read.

    Andrew Wiggin (Ender, age 6) is a Third. A Third is the third born in a family. All the families are only allowed to have two children, unless given special permission. Because Ender is a Third, he gets beaten up a lot by his classmates and his older brother, Peter (age 12). When she is there, Valentine, Ender’s older sister (age 10), always defends him.

    All the children are created, and I mean created, to be a member of the Earth’s army. All the kids want to get in, but only the smartest kids do. Unknown to the children, the government is only looking for a new general of the army. Like Mr. F said, the buggers invaded twice. Those attacks were known as the first and second invasion. Earth is planning the third invasion, trying to get rid of the buggers once and for all.

    Peter, Valentine, and Ender are all exceptionally smart. However, Peter is too aggressive. The government tried to clone him, but to be less deadly. The result was Valentine. But Valentine is too compassionate. The government then made a clone of Peter AND Valentine, resulting in Ender.

    After he gets his monitor off, which many kids do, he went to school like he normally would. The difference was that the bullies noticed he had it no longer, and tormented him. Kids with a monitor on have protection, provided by the military. But when it is off, there is no more protection.

    After fighting a group of bullies, and winning, Ender walks triumphantly home. After getting tortured in a game of Buggers Vs Astronauts (buggers hardly win) against Peter, the family is sitting down for dinner. There is a knock at the door, and behind it stands colonel Graff, the head of the Battle School. (The Battle School is the place where all the kids want to go.)

    I will let this suspense end my writing today, and it makes you want to read the book, right? I DO disagree with the rating, however. I think it should be a WAY80.

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